Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘unity’

We live in a time of rapid technological advances, when staying in touch with one another through our phones and computers is easier than ever before. With just a few keystrokes or clicks of the mouse, we can bring the world into our living room. And with so much convenience, even devout churchgoers sometimes ask, “Why bother going to church?” If we can hear the same sermons in the comfort of our homes, or even watch church services online, and round it out with our own favorite worship music, is there any reason to actually go to church?

The answer is a resounding, “Yes!” Why?

    1. The Bible instructs us to assemble.
      The author of Hebrews instructs readers to “…consider one another in order to stir up love and good works, not forsaking the assembling of ourselves together, as is the manner of some, but exhorting one another, and so much the more as you see the Day approaching” (Hebrews 10:24-25). Not only are we told not to forsake assembling together, but are also told why we should:
    2. It’s not just about us.
      You can get a lot of information from a sermon online. You can learn, you can feel closer to God, you can have your faith strengthened. What you can’t do by sitting at home and listening to sermons is help anyone else. The writer’s instruction in Hebrews 10:24-25 doesn’t stop at telling us to assemble; he explains that instead of forsaking assembly, we ought to consider one another to stir up love, to stir up good works, and to exhort each other. Church services aren’t just about getting our spiritual needs met: they are a way for us to make sure that others are getting their spiritual needs met, as well as their physical and emotional needs.
    3. The church isn’t just a place, it’s people.When we are baptized, we aren’t baptized into a building, or into an organization: we are baptized into the body of Christ. Paul writes that “by one Spirit we were all baptized into one body…in fact the body is not one member but many…” (1 Corinthians 12:13,14). In this chapter, Paul reiterates several times the thought that we are one body but also individual members. While he is talking about the spiritual gifts that God has endowed on the members of the body, he also brings out that we are to be a body in unity: “…God composed the body…that there should be no schism in the body, but that the members should have the same care for one another…” (1 Corinthians 12:24,25). We are not called to be isolated individuals, all doing our own thing: God called us to put us together as a united body.
    4. Spiritual gifts are used when we are together.
      Writing in Romans 12, Paul states, “we, being many, are one body in Christ, and individually members of one another” (Romans 12:5). Again, Paul’s main point is to explain the diversity of spiritual gifts, but how they ought to work together to bring unity. The concept of spiritual gifts is an important one, individually and for the church. In Ephesians, Paul expounds on why Christ gave the gifts:“And He Himself gave some to be apostles, some prophets, some evangelists, and some pastors and teachers, for the equipping of the saints for the work of ministry, for the edifying of the body of Christ, till we all come to the unity of the faith and of the knowledge of the Son of God, to a perfect man, to the measure of the stature of the fullness of Christ; that we should no longer be children, tossed to and fro and carried about with every wind of doctrine, by the trickery of men, in the cunning craftiness of deceitful plotting, but, speaking the truth in love, may grow up in all things into Him who is the head—Christ— from whom the whole body, joined and knit together by what every joint supplies, according to the effective working by which every part does its share, causes growth of the body for the edifying of itself in love” (Ephesians 4:11-16).The gifts aren’t given to benefit the recipient: the gifts are given so that the recipient can benefit others, in the context of Christ’s body, the church. For every part to do its share, the body has to be knit together as one. And that can’t happen if various parts of the body scatter themselves away from the body.
    5. Christ attended church.
      Luke writes that Christ “came to Nazareth, where He had been brought up. And as His custom was, He went into the synagogue on the Sabbath day, and stood up to read…” (Luke 4:16). If anyone could have claimed that church held nothing for Him, surely it would have been Christ. What need did the Messiah have for assembling together? But here we see that this appearance in the synagogue with the assembly was not a one-time occurrence: it was His custom.

When we choose to follow Christ, we are baptized into the body of believers, a unified group of individual members. We are given spiritual gifts to help one another and to help unify that body. We are told to care for one another; we are even told that we become members of one another. We are told not to forsake assembling together, but rather to use those assemblies to stir one another to good works. When we come together for weekly services, we also follow our spiritual Head’s example. We must bear these things in mind and then put them into practice. See you at church!

Read Full Post »

Recently, we had the opportunity to help a friend with a home repair project. He needed to waterproof his basement, and in order to do that it was necessary to dig a trench beside the basement wall. This was no small undertaking: the trench would need to be about 7 feet deep and 15 feet long, and wide enough that he could stand down in it. Fortunately, several acquaintances had come to help, lured with the promise of free food.

Digging wasn’t the only task at hand, though it was the main objective: as we dug, the growing pile of dirt needed to be raked and shoveled into a stable heap that wouldn’t collapse back onto the diggers. And to make things a little more exciting, our friend and his wife have a toddler and an infant that needed a close eye kept on them. In addition, we had all ages and skill levels represented, from preteens to teenagers to young adults to my husband and I, who are fast approaching middle age.

The further we dug, the heavier the shovels became as the topsoil turned to clay. As the trench got deeper, fewer people could work in it at one time, because we needed more room to swing the shovels. It was dirty, hot, and graceless work as we dug into the earth below where we were standing and then swung shovels full of damp clay up above our heads.

The fascinating thing to me was that we accomplished this task in several hours that were free from complaining, criticism, or anger. We were all so focused on the work we needed to do, and the help we wanted to give our friends, that we worked closely together without a single negative remark. And as we came together in this difficult task, our combined effort showed itself not only in a growing pile of dirt, but also in a growing together of our love for one another. Where we had been only acquaintances, we developed a new bond of respect and love. Where friendship had already existed, it grew deeper as we tackled a challenge together and spurred one another on. As we came together to do the work, the work itself brought us closer together.

As we finished our digging, late in the afternoon, and gratefully dropped our gloves and shovels, I thought about Ephesians 4:15-16, where Paul writes of his hope that we, the body of Christ, “…speaking the truth in love, may grow up in all things into Him who is the head—Christ— from whom the whole body, joined and knit together by what every joint supplies, according to the effective working by which every part does its share, causes growth of the body for the edifying of itself in love.”

Hard work can indeed bring individuals together and build a deep bond between them. But hard work alone is not enough. We have been called to an enormous task, a lifelong commitment to the work of God. What are the things we need to keep in mind as we labor together so that we do form those deep bonds of respect and love?

1)      We have to speak and act in love. One of the things that set our digging party apart was that there was no complaining or criticism. I didn’t hear even one negative word about the work someone else was doing; instead, I heard politeness and encouraging comments: “Thank you.” “Please.” “You’re a rock star!” “Fantastic job!” Despite having to work very closely together—so close that there were occasional near-misses with flying dirt or shovel handles—our feelings remained intact because we spoke and acted in love towards one another.

2)      We have to be focused on the task we’re trying to accomplish. We each had different duties. Some of us spent most of the time babysitting; others took turns digging, or worked with shovels and rakes to keep the dirt from falling back into the trench. But instead of focusing on whatever our task was at the moment, we kept in mind the bigger goal: digging a ditch. It didn’t really matter who spent the most time digging, or who dug fastest, or who never dug at all; the point was that we were laboring together for a specific cause, and we were committed to doing what needed to be done in order to reach that goal.

3)      Every part must do their share, and every part must respect that the others are doing their share. Imagine how poorly we would have worked together if we had spent our time looking at what everyone else was doing and trying to figure out whether what they were doing was as hard as what we were doing. Not only would the work have taken longer, the atmosphere would have been rotten. We were able to finish our task and grow closer together because we respected the jobs that others were doing, even when it was different from what we were doing. One friend made coffee and went out to get pizza; one entertained the toddler and kept him from getting too close to the work; some were digging, some were raking, and some were resting so they could help when one of the others got tired. All of those tasks were necessary for the completion of the work; without even one of those, the work would have been slower and harder. Every person did their task cheerfully and to the best of their ability, and every person respected the others for doing their tasks.

4)      We have to desire to grow together in love. If we didn’t care about each other, we could still get the task done—but we wouldn’t have the benefit of having created positive bonds of friendship, and that task would have been only a difficult chore. In addition, we would have little motivation to ever work together again. But because we all shared a desire to work well together, and acted in love towards each other, we did grow in love—and we know that we can work well together on any other task that comes up.

The body of Christ has an immense task to do, and we can only accomplish it if we remember these things. We must focus on the larger goal, be willing to do our share, respect that others are doing the task that God has given them to do, and we have to truly desire to grow together in love. If we do all those things, we will indeed grow and edify one another in love, and we will accomplish the commission we have been given. If we do our work in love, then the work will bring us closer together.

Read Full Post »

In the opening verses of 1 Corinthians, the apostle Paul address his letter to “those who are sanctified in Christ Jesus, called to be saints…” (1 Cor. 1:2). This word “sanctified” has the meaning of something being set apart for a specific purpose–in this case, set apart by God’s calling. Now, the idea of being set apart implies a separation of some kind. And indeed, we read in John 17 that we are to be set apart. Christ, in praying to His Father, said, “I have given them Your word; and the world has hated them because they are not of the world, just as I am not of the world. I do not pray that You should take them out of the world, but that You should keep them from the evil one. They are not of the world, just as I am not of the world.  Sanctify them by Your truth. Your word is truth” (John 17:14-17).

So we see that we are called by God to be set apart from the world–in it, not of it–set apart by His truth and His Spirit (1 Cor. 6:1). As Christ was in the world but not of the world, so we are to walk among the world but not along its paths. We are called to be something different. We are to be strangers to this world, as Peter writes in 1 Peter 2:11-12: “Beloved, I beg you as sojourners and pilgrims, abstain from fleshly lusts which war against the soul, having your conduct honorable among the Gentiles, that when they speak against you as evildoers, they may, by your good works which they observe, glorify God in the day of visitation.”

Not only does Peter explain how we are to walk apart from the world, he tells us why: so that those who are in the world will see our good works, our “apartness,” and be moved to glorify God. We are to represent God and His ways to those around us, and thus flee the works of unrighteousness. As Paul writes in 1 Corinthians 6:19-20, “Or do you not know that your body is the temple of the Holy Spirit who is in you, whom you have from God, and you are not your own? For you were bought at a price; therefore glorify God in your body and in your spirit, which are God’s.”

For all this talk about being “set apart,” however, there is one way in which we are not supposed to be set apart; we are not to be set apart from our brethren. In Jesus’ prayer, He does not pray for His followers as individuals as much as He prays for them as a body. In fact, a few sentences later, He prayed, ““I do not pray for these alone, but also for those who will believe in Me through their word; that they all may be one, as You, Father, are in Me, and I in You; that they also may be one in Us, that the world may believe that You sent Me. And the glory which You gave Me I have given them, that they may be one just as We are one: I in them, and You in Me; that they may be made perfect in one, and that the world may know that You have sent Me, and have loved them as You have loved Me” (John 17:20-23). Notice that He ties a mission (teaching the world that Christ was sent by His Father to the world) to our unity.

No wonder, then, that back in 1 Corinthians 1:10 Paul pleads with the Corinthian brethren, “Now I plead with you, brethren, by the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, that you all speak the same thing, and that there be no divisions among you, but that you be perfectly joined together in the same mind and in the same judgment.” Christ prayed that we would be one as He and His Father are one, with no division at all. Paul points out that none of us has anything to glory about, save God’s mercy: “For you see your calling, brethren, that not many wise according to the flesh, not many mighty, not many noble, are called. But God has chosen the foolish things of the world to put to shame the wise, and God has chosen the weak things of the world to put to shame the things which are mighty; and the base things of the world and the things which are despised God has chosen, and the things which are not, to bring to nothing the things that are, 29 that no flesh should glory in His presence…that, as it is written, ‘He who glories, let him glory in the LORD'” (1 Cor. 1:26-29, 31).

Division amongst ourselves in unacceptable. As Paul asked in 1 Corinthians 1:13, is Christ divided? No! But before we start looking at larger divisions and corporate issues, perhaps it is best to first look at ourselves as individuals. It is very easy, when thinking of division, to start thinking about groups that disintegrate. However, any group that experiences a division experiences it because of what started as individual decisions. So let us ask ourselves: do we ever speak things that cause division? How is our speech? What are our actions like? Do our words and behaviors “Honor all people. Love the brotherhood. Fear God. Honor the king” (1 Pet. 2:17)?

James had plenty of reason to rail against the improper use of speech in his book. He wrote, “But no man can tame the tongue. It is an unruly evil, full of deadly poison. With it we bless our God and Father, and with it we curse men, who have been made in the similitude of God. Out of the same mouth proceed blessing and cursing. My brethren, these things ought not to be so” (James 3:8-10). How are we doing? When someone’s name comes out of our mouth, is it because we are talking about their positive qualities? Is it because we are speaking in love and honor? If they heard what words we attached to their name, would they be uplifted and encouraged, or devastated?

Do we have our own little group that we think is somehow “better” than everyone else–or at least “better” than a small group of others we see as inferior? Watch out! James warns, “My brethren, do not hold the faith of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord of glory, with partiality…If you really fulfill the royal law according to the Scripture, “You shall love your neighbor as yourself,” you do well; but if you show partiality, you commit sin, and are convicted by the law as transgressors” (James 2:1, 8-10).

Division and partiality are serious matters. We are called to be “set apart” from the world and united with our brethren. As Peter wrote, “But you are a chosen generation, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, His own special people, that you may proclaim the praises of Him who called you out of darkness into His marvelous light; who once were not a people but are now the people of God, who had not obtained mercy but now have obtained mercy” (1 Peter 2:9-10). We who are Christian are called to be a special people to God. We were not, before our calling, a nation or people unto ourselves. His calling may be the only thing we have in common with some of our brethren. Paul put it very clearly in Colossians 3:8-15: “But now you yourselves are to put off all these: anger, wrath, malice, blasphemy, filthy language out of your mouth. Do not lie to one another, since you have put off the old man with his deeds, and have put on the new man who is renewed in knowledge according to the image of Him who created him, where there is neither Greek nor Jew, circumcised nor uncircumcised, barbarian, Scythian, slave nor free, but Christ is all and in all.

 Therefore, as the elect of God, holy and beloved, put on tender mercies, kindness, humility, meekness, longsuffering; bearing with one another, and forgiving one another, if anyone has a complaint against another; even as Christ forgave you, so you also must do. But above all these things put on love, which is the bond of perfection. And let the peace of God rule in your hearts, to which also you were called in one body; and be thankful.”

As Thanksgiving approaches this week in the United States, let us carefully consider our calling and sanctification. We have been set apart for the Lord’s purposes. It is by our unity that we are to show forth His greatness. We ought to be thankful not just for our individual calling, but for the calling of our brethren in the faith. We will show that gratitude in our actions and words as we speak to and about one another, as we move among one another in love. Let us be sure that in our speech and behavior there is no partiality or malice toward anyone, but love and right speaking and right action. Let us “Honor all people. Love the brotherhood. Fear God. Honor the king” (1 Pet. 2:17).

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: